GUYTON HALL TEXTBOOK MEDICAL PHYSIOLOGY 13TH EDITION PDF

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Textbook of medical physiology / Arthur C. Guyton, John E. Hall.—11th ed. .. became widely used throughout the world and was translated into 13 languages. Guyton and Hall textbook of medical physiology / John Hall. – 12th ed. p. ; cm. of Medical Physiology were written entirely by Dr. Guyton, . CHAPTER Pocket Companion to Guyton Guyton and Hall Physiology and Hall Textbook of Medical Review, 3rd Edition Physiology, 13th Edition John E. Hall, PhD John E.


Guyton Hall Textbook Medical Physiology 13th Edition Pdf

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The 13th edition of Guyton and Hall Textbook of Medical Physiology continues this bestselling title's long tradition as the world's foremost medical physiology. April Read the Description carefully Guyton and Hall Textbook of Medical Physiology, (Guyton Physiology) Edition (PDF) ISBN: Ed. Editorial Reviews. Review. BMA Awards: Highly Commended, Basic & Clinical Sciences. "The 13th edition of Guyton and Hall Textbook of Medical.

Hall, PhD Arthur C. Hall, PhD, Arthur C.

The Cell and General Physiology 1. The Cell and Its Functions 3. Transport of Substances Through Cell Membranes 5. Membrane Potentials and Action Potentials 6. Contraction of Skeletal Muscle 7. Excitation of Skeletal Muscle: Neuromuscular Transmission and Excitation-Contraction Coupling 8.

Rhythmical Excitation of the Heart The Normal Electrocardiogram Vectorial Analysis The Microcirculation and Lymphatic System: Cardiac Failure The Body Fluid Compartments: Extracellular and Intracellular Fluids; Edema The Urinary System: Functional Anatomy and Urine Formation by the Kidneys Renal Tubular Reabsorption and Secretion Acid-Base Regulation Red Blood Cells, Anemia, and Polycythemia Resistance of the Body to Infection: Immunity and Allergy Pulmonary Ventilation Regulation of Respiration Aviation, High Altitude, and Space Physiology General Principles and Sensory Physiology Somatic Sensations: General Organization, the Tactile and Position Senses Somatic sensations: The Special Senses The Eye: Optics of Vision Receptor and Neural Function of the Retina Central Neurophysiology of Vision The Sense of Hearing Motor and Integrative Neurophysiology Propulsion and Mixing of Food in the Alimentary Tract Secretory Functions of the Alimentary Tract Digestion and Absorption in the Gastrointestinal Tract Metabolism of Carbohydrates and Formation of Adenosine Triphosphate Lipid Metabolism Aviation, High Altitude, and Space Physiology The Nervous System: A.

General Principles and Sensory Physiology Somatic Sensations: I.

General Organization, the Tactile and Position Senses Somatic sensations: II. Pain, Headache, and Thermal Sensations X.

The Nervous System: B. The Special Senses The Eye: I.

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Optics of Vision The Eye: II. Receptor and Neural Function of the Retina The Eye: III. Central Neurophysiology of Vision The Sense of Hearing The Nervous System: C. Motor and Integrative Neurophysiology Gastrointestinal Physiology Propulsion and Mixing of Food in the Alimentary Tract This extracellular fluid is in constant motion throughout the body.

In the extracellular fluid are the ions and nutrients needed by the cells to maintain life. Thus, all cells live in essentially the same environment—the extracellular fluid. Differences Between Extracellular and Intracellular Fluids.

The extracellular fluid contains large amounts of sodium, chloride, and bicarbonate ions plus nutrients for the cells, such as oxygen, glucose, fatty acids, and amino acids.

These transport processes are discussed in Chapter 4. Essentially all organs and tissues of the body perform functions that help maintain these relatively constant conditions. For instance, the lungs provide oxygen to the extracellular fluid to replenish the oxygen used by the cells, the kidneys maintain constant ion concentrations, and the gastrointestinal system provides nutrients.

The various ions, nutrients, waste products, and other constituents of the body are normally regulated within a range of values, rather than at fixed values. Variations in blood hydrogen ion concentration, for example, are normally less than 5 nanomoles per liter 0. Blood sodium concentration is also tightly regulated, normally varying only a few millimoles per liter even with large changes in sodium intake, but these variations of sodium concentration are at least 1 million times greater than for hydrogen ions.

Powerful control systems exist for maintaining the concentrations of sodium and hydrogen ions, as well as for most of the other ions, nutrients, and substances in the body at levels that permit the cells, tissues, and organs to perform their normal functions despite wide environmental variations and challenges from injury and diseases. A large segment of this text is concerned with how each organ or tissue contributes to homeostasis. Normal body functions require the integrated actions of cells, tissues, organs, and the multiple nervous, hormonal, and local control systems that together contribute to homeostasis and good health.

Disease is often considered to be a state of disrupted homeostasis. However, even in the presence of disease, homeostatic mechanisms continue to operate and maintain vital functions through multiple compensations. This balance is needed to maintain life, but over long periods of time the high blood pressure can damage various organs, including the kidneys, causing even greater increases in blood pressure and more renal damage.

Guyton and Hall Textbook of Medical Physiology PDF Free Download [Direct Link]

The discipline of pathophysiology seeks to explain how the various physiological processes are altered in diseases or injury. The first stage is movement of blood through the body in the blood vessels, and the second is movement of fluid between the blood capillaries and the intercellular spaces between the tissue cells.

Figure shows the overall circulation of blood. All the blood in the circulation traverses the entire circulatory circuit an average of once each minute when the body is at rest and as many as six times each minute when a person is extremely active.

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As blood passes through the blood capillaries, continual exchange of extracellular fluid also occurs between the plasma portion of the blood and the interstitial fluid that fills the intercellular spaces. This process is shown in Figure The walls of the capillaries are permeable to most molecules in the plasma of the blood, with the exception of plasma proteins, which are too large to readily pass through the capillaries. That is, the fluid and dissolved molecules are continually moving and bouncing in all directions within the plasma and the fluid in the intercellular spaces, as well as through the capillary pores.

Diffusion of fluid and dissolved constituents through the capillary walls and through the interstitial spaces. Nutrition and excretion Gastrointestinal Tract.

A large portion of the blood Kidneys pumped by the heart also passes through the walls of the gastrointestinal tract. Not all substances absorbed from Regulation of electrolytes Excretion Venous end Arterial end the gastrointestinal tract can be used in their absorbed form by the cells. The liver changes the chemical compositions of many of these substances to more usable forms, and other tissues of the body—fat cells, gastrointestinal mucosa, kidneys, and endocrine glands—help modify the absorbed substances or store them until they are needed.

The liver also eliminates certain waste products produced in the body and toxic substances that are ingested. Musculoskeletal System. How does the musculoskele- Capillaries Figure General organization of the circulatory system. Figure shows that each time the blood passes through the body, it also flows through the lungs.As blood passes through the blood capillaries, continual exchange of extracellular fluid also occurs between the plasma portion of the blood and the interstitial fluid that fills the intercellular spaces.

The Normal Electrocardiogram Fetal and Neonatal Physiology XV. Renal Tubular Reabsorption and Secretion The Body Fluids and Kidneys Acid-Base Regulation Pain, Headache, and Thermal Sensations X.

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